Indoor Air Quality

Have you ever considered that the indoor air you breathe may contain more chemicals than the exterior environments.  Because we store and use a multitude of commercial products to clean our homes and protect against a variety of pests, we are continuously introducing chemicals into our home environment.  These chemicals then are released into the indoor air.  So, as we all work harder to make our homes cleaner, safer and more energy efficient, these chemicals become "locked" in the air we breathe, because they have little opportunity to exit our homes.  Our young children are especially sensitive to these indoor air pollutants.  For example, a potential contributor to in-home pollution is the new compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb.  CLF bulbs are designed to replace incandescent bulbs and fit into most existing home light fixtures.  Compared to general service incandescent bulbs, CFLs generally use less power and have a longer rated life.  CFL bulbs save energy and, therefore, reduce the pollution inherent in the production of electricity.  The problem is that these bulbs contain small amounts of elemental mercury, a known human neurotoxin.  Mercury contained in CFLs can be released in the home if the bulb is broken.  When a bulb breaks, mercury escapes as both a solid and as a vapor.  The vapor can be inhaled and the solid, as small liquid beads, can settle into carpets and other textiles.  State and federal agencies say that breakages can usually be cleaned up inexpensively with household goods.  See our What You Need To Know article titled Mercury and Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs for more details.   The Healthy Roots Project® is committed to helping homeowners assess the quality of their indoor air and assist in developing innovative ways to breathe healthier indoor air.

Mercury and Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

A potential contributor to in-home pollutin is the new compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb.  CFL bulbs are designed to replace incandescent bulbs and fit into most existing home light fixtures.  Compared to general service incandescent bulbs, CFLs generally use less power and have a longer rated life.  CFL bulbs save energy and, therefore, reduce the pollution inherent in the production of electiricity.  The problem is that these bulbs contain small amounts of elemental mercury, a known human neurotoxin.  Mercury contained in CFLs can be released in the home if the bulb is broken.  When a bulb breaks, mercury escapes as both a solid and as a vapor.  The vapor can be inhaled and the solid, as a fine powder, can settle into carpets and other textiles.  State and federal agencies say that breakages can usually be cleaned up inexpensively with household goods.  Read entire article .......